Sermon Archive

TFC-Adults: Introduction to “Soul Feast” with Anna Miller

October 2, 2019 (Wednesday Night) | Anna Perry Miller

Maybe you have thought about pursuing a study that might take you deeper in your walk with God. Maybe you have been part of deep Bible study courses or seminars before and you’d like to consider doing this again. On Wednesday night, October 2, there was an overview of the study, Soul Feast, that begins October 6. This will allow you to hear about the themes that will be discussed in greater depth, learn how the class will function, and decide for yourself if you want to pursue this opportunity. The Wednesday night session will be designed to be thoughtful even if you choose that further sessions are not for you.

 

TFC-Adults: “This is Us, RRCB” with the Breckenridge Family

September 25, 2019 (Wednesday Night) | David, Leigh Ann, Seth, and Micah Breckenridge interviewed by Daniel Glaze

“This is Us, RRCB,” an interview with the Breckenridge family. David joined our staff as the Minister of Pastoral Care in April, moving here from Memphis. He is continuing his studies as he ministers among us. Come get better acquainted with them and learn about their family, what brought them here, and what they enjoy.

 

There is a Balm in Gilead

September 22, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Jeremiah 8:18-9:1; 1 Timothy 2:1-7 | Daniel Glaze

Jeremiah asks that haunting question, “Is there no balm in Gilead?” In other words, “Is God with us? Does God even care?” I don’t mean to gloss over the question, for it’s a good one. But the answer, I believe, is a resounding yes. Yes, there is a balm in Gilead. This balm gives us a promise. It’s not a promise that protects us from tragedy and heartache, but it is a promise that we will never face life alone.

Worship Bulletin – September 22, 2019

 

 

 

Donate It Forward

Sheep and Sweep

September 15, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: 1 Timothy 1:12-17; Luke 15:1-10 | Daniel Glaze

Sometimes in life we feel alone and forgotten. Jesus tells us that God the Good Shepherd has not forgotten about you. With shepherd’s crook in hand, he wants to bring you home. God the Good Sweeper has taken up her broom and she will sweep until every last one of us is found.

Worship Bulletin – September 15, 2019

 

Bland Mission Trip Commissioning

 

TFC-Adults: A Time of Remembering 9/11 with Jim Slatton

September 11, 2019 (Wednesday Night) | Dr. Jim Slatton and Dr. C. Michael Hawn

Where were you on September 11, 2001? It is a day so many remember in great detail with deep sadness. Hard to believe, is the fact that high school students today were not alive then. Following this horrific event and the days of questions, concerns, and prayers, churches gathered to worship and find community in which to share emotions and thoughts, and seek a way forward. River Road Church was filled to the brim, with standing room only the following Sunday. Rev. Dr. Jim Slatton had the arduous task of offering a word from the Lord; of acknowledging the reality of evil and the compassion of Christ, holding out hope for a future in a world forever changed. Dr. Slatton recalled that Sunday and offered highlights from his message, which is preserved in writing in our archives.

Click here to read Dr. Slatton’s September 16, 2001 Sermon: “For Such a Time as This”

 

Jesus Follows the Rules

September 1, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Proverbs 25:6-7; Luke 14:1, 7-14

Last week we talked about Jesus breaking the rules and when it might be okay for us to do the same. This week we’ll look at when Jesus followed the rules—his own rules. I suspect Jesus has many rules for us to follow, especially at the table (which is the context for today’s scripture), but the most important one is this: when Jesus hosts the banquest, everyone is invited.

Worship Bulletin – September 1, 2019

 

 

Singing Love in a Culture of Hate

September 1, 2019 (Holland Lectures) | C. Michael Hawn

Holland Lectures 2019
“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are:
Developing a Congregational Identity through Congregational Singing”
with Dr. C. Michael Hawn

As strange as it may seem, singing together has the potential to stem hate. The great commandment: “Love God and love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:30-31; Matthew 22:36-40; Luke 10:27) is rarely quoted in an age of division and hate. Perhaps we need to take what we sing in our sanctuaries to the streets. The Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s is perhaps the most powerful recent example of this. Somehow the songs of this era have given way to strident shrieks and slogans of hate. What might we sing that brings disparate groups – economically, ethnically, politically – together for the good of humanity…

 

 

C. Michael Hawn is one of our nation’s leading experts in hymnology and world music. Now a Richmonder, he recently retired after 25 years from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, as University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and director of the Sacred Music Program. Previously he taught at two Baptist seminaries for a total of 15 years. He leads festivals and publishes extensively in the area of hymnology, is the USA Editor for the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, and writes a weekly hymn studies column entitled History of Hymns. A student of global Christian music, Hawn has conducted research and taught in over 40 countries. In addition, he has sung extensively as a countertenor and is a recovering accordion player.

Congregational singing both forms our individual faith perspective, but also shapes us as the body of Christ in community. These lectures will examine our hymnic heritage that have shaped our faith, look at some trends that are currently influencing the ecumenical church, and consider the cultural, societal, and ethical issues that inspire what we might sing in the future.

“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are.” — Albert van den Heuvel (World Council of Churches, 1966)

Jesus Breaks the Rules

August 25, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Isaiah 5:1-7; Luke 12:49 -56 | Sermon: Dr. Daniel Glaze | Organist: Dr. Bob Gallagher | Guest Choir Director: Rev. Paul Honaker | Guest Accompanist: Mr. Robert Ford | Guest Choir: Jubilation Choir

Jesus didn’t break the rules for fun—he had a purpose. Jesus broke rules for people. When it came to following the rules or blessing people, he chose people every time.

The Jubilation Choir, a senior adult community choir for adults age 55 and older, is in its nineteenth season as an outreach program of the Music Ministry of Salisbury Presbyterian Church. The seventy-two member choir represents approximately thirty-two churches from eight denominations in the Richmond area. Founded in 2001, the choir meets weekly from September through May to sing sacred, secular, and patriotic music. Its mission is to spread fellowship and goodwill through music. Their director is the Rev. Paul S. Honaker, a member of River Road Church, and Mr. Robert R. Ford, a retired United Methodist Church musician, is their pianist.

Worship Bulletin – August 25, 2019

 

 

Ten (or more) Hymns Written in the Twenty-first Century Everyone Should Learn

August 25, 2018 (Holland Lectures) | C. Michael Hawn

Holland Lectures 2019
“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are:
Developing a Congregational Identity through Congregational Singing”
with Dr. C. Michael Hawn

“Each generation must add its stanza to the great hymn of the church,” says my friend United Methodist Bishop Joel Martinez. What is our age saying about our faith and life that has not been said before? As important as it is to sing the songs of the saints, a vital sung faith should also incorporate the “new song” (Psalm 96:1). New songs, if chosen well, can point us in the direction the church should be heading. Yes, we can sing our way to a more faithful church.

 

 

C. Michael Hawn is one of our nation’s leading experts in hymnology and world music. Now a Richmonder, he recently retired after 25 years from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, as University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and director of the Sacred Music Program. Previously he taught at two Baptist seminaries for a total of 15 years. He leads festivals and publishes extensively in the area of hymnology, is the USA Editor for the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, and writes a weekly hymn studies column entitled History of Hymns. A student of global Christian music, Hawn has conducted research and taught in over 40 countries. In addition, he has sung extensively as a countertenor and is a recovering accordion player.

Congregational singing both forms our individual faith perspective, but also shapes us as the body of Christ in community. These lectures will examine our hymnic heritage that have shaped our faith, look at some trends that are currently influencing the ecumenical church, and consider the cultural, societal, and ethical issues that inspire what we might sing in the future.

“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are.” — Albert van den Heuvel (World Council of Churches, 1966)

Overtaken by Choice

August 18, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Isaiah 5:1-7; Luke 12:49 -56 | Sermon: Rev. Anna Perry Miller | Guest Organist: Raymond Chenault | Guest Pianist: Beth Chenault | Soloist: John Tibbetts, baritone

We welcomed to the pulpit Rev. Anna Perry Miller, our Associate Pastor for Adult Discipleship.

We welcomed Raymond Chenault guest organist, Beth Chenault, pianist, and John Tibbetts, soloist this morning. Mr. Chenault and Mr. Tibbetts will be performing in our concert series May 17, 2020.

Worship Bulletin – August 18, 2019

 

 

The Meditative and Prayerful Music of the Taizé Community

August 18, 2018 (Holland Lectures) | C. Michael Hawn

Holland Lectures 2019
“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are:
Developing a Congregational Identity through Congregational Singing”
with Dr. C. Michael Hawn

What can Christians sing together if they come from different countries, speak different languages, and have been nurtured in a wide range of Christian perspectives? For seventy years, an ecumenical monastic community in the village of Taizé in southeastern France has been a point of pilgrimage for young people from around the world. Amenities are spartan; Internet is sporadic; food is simple; the community is authentic and spiritually rich. What can we learn from Taizé song and this way of praying?

 

 

C. Michael Hawn is one of our nation’s leading experts in hymnology and world music. Now a Richmonder, he recently retired after 25 years from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, as University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and director of the Sacred Music Program. Previously he taught at two Baptist seminaries for a total of 15 years. He leads festivals and publishes extensively in the area of hymnology, is the USA Editor for the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, and writes a weekly hymn studies column entitled History of Hymns. A student of global Christian music, Hawn has conducted research and taught in over 40 countries. In addition, he has sung extensively as a countertenor and is a recovering accordion player.

Congregational singing both forms our individual faith perspective, but also shapes us as the body of Christ in community. These lectures will examine our hymnic heritage that have shaped our faith, look at some trends that are currently influencing the ecumenical church, and consider the cultural, societal, and ethical issues that inspire what we might sing in the future.

“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are.” — Albert van den Heuvel (World Council of Churches, 1966)

To Challenge and Comfort

August 11, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Isaiah 1:1, 10-20; Hebrews 11:1-3 | Sermon: Rev. Dr. Timothy Norman | Guest Organist: Daniel Stipe | Soloist: Christopher Ahart, tenor

We welcomed the Rev. Dr. Timothy K. Norman to our pulpit. Tim and Kathryn are members of River Road Church and the Friendship Sunday School Class. Tim is a retired pastor and denominational Executive.

Welcome to Daniel Stipe, our guest organist and choir director this morning. A native of Tulsa, Oklahoma, Daniel is a graduate of University of North Texas and Westminster Choir College and resides in Richmond with his wife Julie.

Worship Bulletin – August 11, 2019

 

 

Rich Toward God

August 4, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Hosea 11:1-11; Luke 12:13-21 | Sermon: Daniel Glaze | Guest Organist: David Gulick | Soloist: Michelle Harman-Gulick, soprano

If we knew we would die tomorrow, how would our priorities shift? Would we work harder at the office? Or would we spend more time with loved ones? Would we shore up our retirement accounts or would we give our possessions away? As Jesus explains, “one’s life is not defined by the abundance of things.” In other words, the most important things in life aren’t things at all.

Worship Bulletin – August 4, 2019

 

 

Ten (or more) Hymns That Have Shaped Baptist Faith Perspective

August 4, 2018 (Holland Lectures) | C. Michael Hawn

Holland Lectures 2019
“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are:
Developing a Congregational Identity through Congregational Singing”
with Dr. C. Michael Hawn

Each tradition is shaped by the faith they sing. What have Baptists contributed to the wealth of congregational song, for example, in the areas of scriptural integrity and religious freedom? What Baptists are writing hymns today and what are they saying? You may be surprised!

 

 

C. Michael Hawn is one of our nation’s leading experts in hymnology and world music. Now a Richmonder, he recently retired after 25 years from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, as University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and director of the Sacred Music Program. Previously he taught at two Baptist seminaries for a total of 15 years. He leads festivals and publishes extensively in the area of hymnology, is the USA Editor for the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, and writes a weekly hymn studies column entitled History of Hymns. A student of global Christian music, Hawn has conducted research and taught in over 40 countries. In addition, he has sung extensively as a countertenor and is a recovering accordion player.

Congregational singing both forms our individual faith perspective, but also shapes us as the body of Christ in community. These lectures will examine our hymnic heritage that have shaped our faith, look at some trends that are currently influencing the ecumenical church, and consider the cultural, societal, and ethical issues that inspire what we might sing in the future.

“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are.” — Albert van den Heuvel (World Council of Churches, 1966)