Sermon Archive

Knowledge vs. Wisdom

September 23, 2018 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Psalm 1; James 3:13-4:3 | Daniel Glaze

As we continue along through the Letter of James, we are confronted today by a discussion of wisdom. James asks this question: “Who is wise and understanding among you?” His answer to this question demonstrates what he means when he uses the word wisdom. And when James speaks of wisdom, he clearly means something very different than the accumulation of information in the brain.

Pastor Daniel Glaze will preach a sermon series (5 Sundays) from James: a short, yet powerful book of the Bible in its practical encouragement for living faithfully.

 

 

The Tough Task of Tongue-Taming

September 16, 2018 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Isaiah 50:4-9a; James 3:1-12 | Daniel Glaze

James is clear: words matter. Each one of us can remember words spoken to us that cut right through our hearts. Perhaps they were uttered by a schoolyard bully, maybe from the lips of a former spouse or significant other, perhaps judgmental words from the mouth of a pastor. And even if we have been mature enough to forgive, the hurt is still there. How will we use our words…to hurt or to bless?

Pastor Daniel Glaze will preach a sermon series (5 Sundays) from James: a short, yet powerful book of the Bible in its practical encouragement for living faithfully.

 

 

TFC-Adults & TFC-Youth: Intergenerational Discussion with Daniel Glaze and Marnie Fisher-Ingram

September 12, 2018 (Wednesday Night) | Daniel Glaze & Marnie Fisher-Ingram

More and more studies are showing that all of a congregation benefits from intergenerational ministry. Let’s explore why and ways we can do this together as a church family. Adults and youth will meet together for this program.

 

Hymns That People Love to Hate

September 2, 2018 (Holland Lectures) | C. Michael Hawn

Holland Lectures 2018
“The Faith We Sing: Singing and Shaping Belief in the 21st Century Church”
with C. Michael Hawn

 

 

C. Michael Hawn is one of our nation’s leading experts in hymnology and world music. Now a Richmonder, he recently retired after 25 years from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, as University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and director of the Sacred Music Program. Previously he taught at two Baptist seminaries for a total of 15 years. He leads festivals and publishes extensively in the area of hymnology, is the USA Editor for the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, and writes a weekly hymn studies column entitled History of Hymns. A student of global Christian music, Hawn has conducted research and taught in over 40 countries. In addition, he has sung extensively as a countertenor and is a recovering accordion player.

Singing is in the DNA of most Christian traditions. While not unique to Christian communities, congregational singing is certainly part of the identity of Christian worship. Not all of the other great religious traditions integrate the people’s song into their communal gatherings. One might even go as far as to say that participation in congregational singing is one measure of the health and vitality of a church. This is not about musical proficiency or that better congregations sing more in tune; it is in terms of the range of congregational song that connects a local congregation with its heritage, its community, Christians ecumenically, and the needs of the world. You’re invited to join Hawn for four Sunday sessions in August and explore what it means to shape our belief through song.

Radical at Heart: Our Bold Baptist Heritage of Dissent

August 29, 2018 (Special Service: Vespers 2018) | Rev. Nathan L. Taylor

Nathan L. Taylor serves as executive director of the Virginia Baptist Historical Society and the Center for Baptist Heritage and Studies, situated on the campus of the University of Richmond. In previous roles, he served for over ten years in congregational ministry, and earlier as a seminary development officer and history teacher. He holds the M.Div. from Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond and is in the final stages of the D. Min. at Mercer University’s McAfee School of Theology. Nathan is married to Bryn Bagby Taylor, associate university chaplain, and together they are the parents of Will, a rising first grader.

 

Singing with the Faithful of Every Time and Place: Songs from the Global Church

August 26, 2018 (Holland Lectures) | C. Michael Hawn

Holland Lectures 2018
“The Faith We Sing: Singing and Shaping Belief in the 21st Century Church”
with C. Michael Hawn

 

 

C. Michael Hawn is one of our nation’s leading experts in hymnology and world music. Now a Richmonder, he recently retired after 25 years from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, as University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and director of the Sacred Music Program. Previously he taught at two Baptist seminaries for a total of 15 years. He leads festivals and publishes extensively in the area of hymnology, is the USA Editor for the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, and writes a weekly hymn studies column entitled History of Hymns. A student of global Christian music, Hawn has conducted research and taught in over 40 countries. In addition, he has sung extensively as a countertenor and is a recovering accordion player.

Singing is in the DNA of most Christian traditions. While not unique to Christian communities, congregational singing is certainly part of the identity of Christian worship. Not all of the other great religious traditions integrate the people’s song into their communal gatherings. One might even go as far as to say that participation in congregational singing is one measure of the health and vitality of a church. This is not about musical proficiency or that better congregations sing more in tune; it is in terms of the range of congregational song that connects a local congregation with its heritage, its community, Christians ecumenically, and the needs of the world. You’re invited to join Hawn for four Sunday sessions in August and explore what it means to shape our belief through song.

It’s Time to Let Go

August 19, 2018 (Sunday Morning) | Tracy Hartman

Dr. Hartman began her work as Acting Vice President of Academic Affairs and Dean at Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond (BTSR) on June 1, 2017. Hartman was a member of the first class of M. Div. students at BTSR and won the Miller Award for Academic Achievement upon her graduation in 1995. Her graduate work at Union included ground-breaking research into the relationship between parish setting and preaching style for women pastors.

Dr. Hartman teaches courses in preaching and practical theology, and previously served as director of the seminary’s Supervised Ministry and Doctor of Ministry programs. She is the author of Letting the Other Speak: Proclaiming the Stories of Biblical Women and co-author of New Proclamation Commentary. She also contributed to the Feasting on the Word and Feasting on the Gospels commentary series.

Dr. Hartman served as preacher and preaching instructor for the First Annual Pastor’s Conference  and as preacher and lecturer for the First Annual Lay Women’s Conference at Baptist Theological Seminary at Zimbabwe. She was recently elected president of the Association of Theological Field Educators at their 2017 Biennium Consultation in St. Paul, MN. ATFE, an affiliate of ATS, connects and bridges theory and practice, academy and church, and local and global contexts. She is active in Baptist life and has served as staff member and interim pastor to several Virginia churches. She enjoys preaching throughout the region.

 

 

Christ, the Lord, Is Risen Today: Singing a Theology of the Resurrection for the 21st Century

August 19, 2018 (Holland Lectures) | C. Michael Hawn

Holland Lectures 2018
“The Faith We Sing: Singing and Shaping Belief in the 21st Century Church”
with C. Michael Hawn

 

 

C. Michael Hawn is one of our nation’s leading experts in hymnology and world music. Now a Richmonder, he recently retired after 25 years from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, as University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and director of the Sacred Music Program. Previously he taught at two Baptist seminaries for a total of 15 years. He leads festivals and publishes extensively in the area of hymnology, is the USA Editor for the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, and writes a weekly hymn studies column entitled History of Hymns. A student of global Christian music, Hawn has conducted research and taught in over 40 countries. In addition, he has sung extensively as a countertenor and is a recovering accordion player.

Singing is in the DNA of most Christian traditions. While not unique to Christian communities, congregational singing is certainly part of the identity of Christian worship. Not all of the other great religious traditions integrate the people’s song into their communal gatherings. One might even go as far as to say that participation in congregational singing is one measure of the health and vitality of a church. This is not about musical proficiency or that better congregations sing more in tune; it is in terms of the range of congregational song that connects a local congregation with its heritage, its community, Christians ecumenically, and the needs of the world. You’re invited to join Hawn for four Sunday sessions in August and explore what it means to shape our belief through song.

Brotherly Love

August 15, 2018 (Special Service: Vespers 2018) | Kim Crowley

How can we show forgiveness and mercy? We are given opportunities where we are faced with a choice, for grace or retaliation. How can show the love of the family of God in these moments?

Kim was called as the Interim Minister to Children in June 2016. Previously, she has served as an Associate Minister and Minister to Youth and Children at Richmond area churches. She is a 2009 graduate of Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond, and a 2005 graduate of East Carolina University School of Music. Kim’s husband Chris is also a musician and serves as the Music Minister at Chamberlayne Baptist Church. They have a three-year-old daughter, Erica, and a Shepherd Husky, Iris.

 

Foundation Stones in the Church

August 12, 2018 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: 2 Samuel 24:19-25; Ephesians 2:19-22 | William Tuck

William “Bill” Tuck has been a pastor in four states and taught at seminaries in two. He serves on the Virginia Baptist Historical Society board and the Center for Baptist Heritage and Studies. He earned his Th.D. from the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary and is the author of 30 books, his most recent Star Thrower: A Pastor’s Handbook. He has served as an intentional interim or interim minister for 15 years. He and his wife, Emily, have been members of River Road since 2001.

 

 

Joy to the World: Singing a Theology of the Incarnation for the 21st Century

August 12, 2018 (Holland Lectures) | C. Michael Hawn

Holland Lectures 2018
“The Faith We Sing: Singing and Shaping Belief in the 21st Century Church”
with C. Michael Hawn

 

 

C. Michael Hawn is one of our nation’s leading experts in hymnology and world music. Now a Richmonder, he recently retired after 25 years from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, as University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and director of the Sacred Music Program. Previously he taught at two Baptist seminaries for a total of 15 years. He leads festivals and publishes extensively in the area of hymnology, is the USA Editor for the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, and writes a weekly hymn studies column entitled History of Hymns. A student of global Christian music, Hawn has conducted research and taught in over 40 countries. In addition, he has sung extensively as a countertenor and is a recovering accordion player.

Singing is in the DNA of most Christian traditions. While not unique to Christian communities, congregational singing is certainly part of the identity of Christian worship. Not all of the other great religious traditions integrate the people’s song into their communal gatherings. One might even go as far as to say that participation in congregational singing is one measure of the health and vitality of a church. This is not about musical proficiency or that better congregations sing more in tune; it is in terms of the range of congregational song that connects a local congregation with its heritage, its community, Christians ecumenically, and the needs of the world. You’re invited to join Hawn for four Sunday sessions in August and explore what it means to shape our belief through song.

Being Comfortable with the Uncomfortable: A Personal Reflection from Passport MissionBASE D.C.

August 8, 2018 (Special Service: Vespers 2018)

Scripture: Micah 6:6-8; Luke 10:25-28 | Beth Rooney

Beth is a rising second-year student at the University of Virginia and is pursuing a degree in Elementary Education and Religious Studies. Growing up in River Road Church, she has been a part of the youth group, youth choir, and acolyte team. She just finished six weeks working for Passport with their MissionBASE D.C. team; leading a facilitated mission trip for the churches participating each week. The focus of MissionBASE D.C. was food justice and homelessness working with nonprofits to learn about and help diminish the problem of hunger. She plans on working with Passport again next summer as she prepares to eventually pursue seminary after finishing school at UVA.

 

All Things Bright and Beautiful: Singing a Theology of Creation for the 21st Century

August 5, 2018 (Holland Lectures) | C. Michael Hawn

Holland Lectures 2018
“The Faith We Sing: Singing and Shaping Belief in the 21st Century Church”
with C. Michael Hawn

 

 

C. Michael Hawn is one of our nation’s leading experts in hymnology and world music. Now a Richmonder, he recently retired after 25 years from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, as University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and director of the Sacred Music Program. Previously he taught at two Baptist seminaries for a total of 15 years. He leads festivals and publishes extensively in the area of hymnology, is the USA Editor for the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, and writes a weekly hymn studies column entitled History of Hymns. A student of global Christian music, Hawn has conducted research and taught in over 40 countries. In addition, he has sung extensively as a countertenor and is a recovering accordion player.

Singing is in the DNA of most Christian traditions. While not unique to Christian communities, congregational singing is certainly part of the identity of Christian worship. Not all of the other great religious traditions integrate the people’s song into their communal gatherings. One might even go as far as to say that participation in congregational singing is one measure of the health and vitality of a church. This is not about musical proficiency or that better congregations sing more in tune; it is in terms of the range of congregational song that connects a local congregation with its heritage, its community, Christians ecumenically, and the needs of the world. You’re invited to join Hawn for four Sunday sessions in August and explore what it means to shape our belief through song.

Calling All the Children

August 1, 2018 (Special Service: Vespers 2018)

Scripture: Luke 14:25-33 | Chris Crowley

Sometimes you read what Jesus had to say and think “no, I can’t do that” or “this is too hard.” Chris uses music to explore one such passage (Luke 14:25-33), and asks God to help us navigate this prophetic text on what it is like to be called a disciple of Jesus.

Chris Crowley, better known as “Kim’s Husband,” or “that VCU guy,” is Director of Music Ministry at Chamberlayne Baptist Church. He is working on a Master of Divinity with a concentration in Religious Freedom studies at Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond, and hopes to graduate some time before Erica goes to college. Chris is a classically trained vocalist, clarinetist, collector of folk winds, and terrible keyboardist who thankfully married a piano major. When not at his day job selling lab supplies for Colonial Scientific, at Chamberlayne or BTSR, or parenting, Chris enjoys sleeping and the occasional VCU basketball game.

 

Hear My Prayer

July 29, 2018 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Psalm 145:10-18; Ephesians 3:14-21 | Libby Grammer

Like Paul praying for the Ephesian Christians, I pray for River Road Church and hope that through this overheard prayer, this wonderful congregation might remember who they are in Christ and who they have been to this minister and so many others. I conclude my tenure here as Paul concluded this prayer for the Ephesians: “Now to him who by the power at work within us is able to accomplish abundantly far more than all we can ask or imagine, to him be the glory in the church and in Christ Jesus to all generations, forever and ever. Amen.”

 

 

Courage and Hope

July 18, 2018 (Special Service: Vespers 2018)

Scriptures: 1 Samuel 25:2-19; Matthew 5:1-11 | Kim Crowley

What does it mean to be a hero? Last week our children learned what it means to be God’s hero: to have heart, to have courage, to have wisdom, to have hope, and to have power. How can we show courage and speak truth? What is God calling us to do?

Kim was called as the Interim Minister to Children in June 2016. Previously, she has served as an Associate Minister and Minister to Youth and Children at Richmond area churches. She is a 2009 graduate of Baptist Theological Seminary at Richmond, and a 2005 graduate of East Carolina University School of Music. Kim’s husband Chris is also a musician and serves as the Music Minister at Chamberlayne Baptist Church. They have a three-year-old daughter, Erica, and a Shepherd Husky, Iris.

 

Roses and Thorns

July 15, 2018 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Psalm 24; 2 Corinthians 12:2-10 | Daniel Glaze

Attend a church conference (especially when there are pastors around!) and you’re bound to hear some boasting. Paul is clear that such boasting is not only inappropriate, but perhaps damaging to our witness as people of faith. Instead of boasting in strength, Paul says, let us see our weaknesses as opportunities for God’s love to be revealed.

 

Too Comfortable with Christ?

July 8, 2018 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Psalm 48:9-14; Mark 6:1-13 | Daniel Glaze

Best I can tell, we’re neither a new church or an old one. There are many churches founded years, even centuries, before River Road, and many who’ve cropped up in the last several years. Regardless, we’ve been doing church together a long while. We’ve been hearing the same Jesus stories for 72 years. Like the people in Nazareth from today’s gospel reading, are we too comfortable with Christ to hear his voice anew?

 

Can Grief be Good?

July 1, 2018 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Psalm 30:1-5; Mark 5:21-34 | Daniel Glaze

Grief can be good—especially when it drives us to God. Grief is good when it reminds us we depend on God and God alone for life. And when this unnamed woman brings her grief to Jesus, he doesn’t just heal her, he calls her brings her into his family by calling her “daughter.” (not a minor detail).