Sermon Archive

TFC-Adults: Wealth and Poverty in the Bible and Today: Borrowing, Lending, and Bribery with Rev. Dr. Samuel L. Adams

November 13, 2019 (Wednesday Night) | Rev. Dr. Samuel L. Adams

Long before the term “income inequality” entered our contemporary vocabulary, the Rev. Dr. Samuel L. Adams delved into the subject as it was in biblical times. For three Wednesdays in November, we will hear from Dr. Adams on the economies in the biblical world and what the Old and New Testaments have to say about financial matters today. He will cover such topics as borrowing and lending, inequality, tithing, and the charging of interest. The schedule is:

  • Nov. 6:  Economics in the Biblical World: An Overview
  • Nov. 13: Borrowing, Lending, and Bribery
  • Nov. 20: Obligations to the Poor in Scripture

Samuel L. Adams is the Mary Jane and John F. McNair Chair of Biblical Studies and Professor of Old Testament at Union Presbyterian Seminary. His interests include the wisdom literature of the Bible and beyond, wealth and poverty in the biblical world, apocalypticism, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Egyptology, biblical theology, and the Bible and film. He published the monograph, ‘Social and Economic Life in Second Temple Judea’ (Westminster John Knox, 2014). His first book, ‘Wisdom in Transition: Act and Consequence in Second Temple Instructions'(Brill, 2008), addresses ancient conceptions of retribution and the possibility of an afterlife. Current book projects include a commentary on the Jewish sage Ben Sira (Anchor Yale Bible) and a comprehensive introduction to wisdom literature. As an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), he has served churches in New Haven, CT, Chicago, IL, and in Richmond, VA.

 

TFC-Adults: Wealth and Poverty in the Bible and Today: Economics in the Biblical World: An Overview with Rev. Dr. Samuel L. Adams

November 6, 2019 (Wednesday Night) | Rev. Dr. Samuel L. Adams

Long before the term “income inequality” entered our contemporary vocabulary, the Rev. Dr. Samuel L. Adams delved into the subject as it was in biblical times. For three Wednesdays in November, we will hear from Dr. Adams on the economies in the biblical world and what the Old and New Testaments have to say about financial matters today. He will cover such topics as borrowing and lending, inequality, tithing, and the charging of interest. The schedule is:

  • Nov. 6:  Economics in the Biblical World: An Overview
  • Nov. 13: Borrowing, Lending, and Bribery
  • Nov. 20: Obligations to the Poor in Scripture

Samuel L. Adams is the Mary Jane and John F. McNair Chair of Biblical Studies and Professor of Old Testament at Union Presbyterian Seminary. His interests include the wisdom literature of the Bible and beyond, wealth and poverty in the biblical world, apocalypticism, the Dead Sea Scrolls, Egyptology, biblical theology, and the Bible and film. He published the monograph, ‘Social and Economic Life in Second Temple Judea’ (Westminster John Knox, 2014). His first book, ‘Wisdom in Transition: Act and Consequence in Second Temple Instructions'(Brill, 2008), addresses ancient conceptions of retribution and the possibility of an afterlife. Current book projects include a commentary on the Jewish sage Ben Sira (Anchor Yale Bible) and a comprehensive introduction to wisdom literature. As an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), he has served churches in New Haven, CT, Chicago, IL, and in Richmond, VA.

 

Declaration & Prayer of Commitment: Donate It Forward, Make A Difference

October 27, 2019 (Sunday Morning) | Martha Day Dumas, Buddy Sumner, Marnie Fisher-Ingram

 

 

Leader: Today we recommit ourselves to learning, serving, and worshiping together as River Road Church. Today we renew our promises with God and with one another, including our promise to give generously to God’s work in and through our church.

Congregation: In that spirit, with thanksgiving we lift up our giving pledges for next year. We do so not to boast in our material blessings, but to express gratitude to our loving and generous God.

Leader: We know that today is not simply about pledges, for we celebrate the numerous ways we seek to commit ourselves to God.

Congregation: We recommit ourselves to walking together as the beloved people of God.

Leader: We recommit ourselves to God’s work of justice in a deeply divided world. We are called to know and love God, nurture each other, and welcome all people in the name of Jesus Christ.

Congregation: Today we reaffirm our hope for our church—a home for the weary traveler, a place of welcome for the poor, a comfort for the distressed, a place of salvation for the sinner, a loving family for young and old—for the good of all and the glory of God.

Leader: As individuals, we make these promises to River Road Church as a whole:

Congregation: I commit to participate regularly, because my presence here matters. I promise to share in service to our community and our world, because the world needs a sign of God’s hope. I promise to support the congregation through my gifts of time and money, because my gifts make a difference. I promise to love my neighbors, even when we don’t agree, because we all have a place at the table.

Leader: Together as a congregation, we make promises to each individual member:

Congregation: We promise to be a church where all are welcome. We promise to use our gifts wisely. We promise to create safe spaces where we can wrestle with the hard questions of life. We promise to provide opportunities to worship, learn, and serve. We promise to bear witness to God’s love for this world.

Leader: Together with the prophet Jeremiah we proclaim with one voice:

Congregation: The Lord will be our God, and we will be God’s people!

 

Donate It Forward

TFC-Adults: Introduction to “Soul Feast” with Anna Miller

October 2, 2019 (Wednesday Night) | Anna Perry Miller

Maybe you have thought about pursuing a study that might take you deeper in your walk with God. Maybe you have been part of deep Bible study courses or seminars before and you’d like to consider doing this again. On Wednesday night, October 2, there was an overview of the study, Soul Feast, that begins October 6. This will allow you to hear about the themes that will be discussed in greater depth, learn how the class will function, and decide for yourself if you want to pursue this opportunity. The Wednesday night session will be designed to be thoughtful even if you choose that further sessions are not for you.

 

TFC-Adults: “This is Us, RRCB” with the Breckenridge Family

September 25, 2019 (Wednesday Night) | David, Leigh Ann, Seth, and Micah Breckenridge interviewed by Daniel Glaze

“This is Us, RRCB,” an interview with the Breckenridge family. David joined our staff as the Minister of Pastoral Care in April, moving here from Memphis. He is continuing his studies as he ministers among us. Come get better acquainted with them and learn about their family, what brought them here, and what they enjoy.

 

There is a Balm in Gilead

September 22, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Jeremiah 8:18-9:1; 1 Timothy 2:1-7 | Daniel Glaze

Jeremiah asks that haunting question, “Is there no balm in Gilead?” In other words, “Is God with us? Does God even care?” I don’t mean to gloss over the question, for it’s a good one. But the answer, I believe, is a resounding yes. Yes, there is a balm in Gilead. This balm gives us a promise. It’s not a promise that protects us from tragedy and heartache, but it is a promise that we will never face life alone.

Worship Bulletin – September 22, 2019

 

 

 

Donate It Forward

Sheep and Sweep

September 15, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: 1 Timothy 1:12-17; Luke 15:1-10 | Daniel Glaze

Sometimes in life we feel alone and forgotten. Jesus tells us that God the Good Shepherd has not forgotten about you. With shepherd’s crook in hand, he wants to bring you home. God the Good Sweeper has taken up her broom and she will sweep until every last one of us is found.

Worship Bulletin – September 15, 2019

 

Bland Mission Trip Commissioning

 

TFC-Adults: A Time of Remembering 9/11 with Jim Slatton

September 11, 2019 (Wednesday Night) | Dr. Jim Slatton and Dr. C. Michael Hawn

Where were you on September 11, 2001? It is a day so many remember in great detail with deep sadness. Hard to believe, is the fact that high school students today were not alive then. Following this horrific event and the days of questions, concerns, and prayers, churches gathered to worship and find community in which to share emotions and thoughts, and seek a way forward. River Road Church was filled to the brim, with standing room only the following Sunday. Rev. Dr. Jim Slatton had the arduous task of offering a word from the Lord; of acknowledging the reality of evil and the compassion of Christ, holding out hope for a future in a world forever changed. Dr. Slatton recalled that Sunday and offered highlights from his message, which is preserved in writing in our archives.

Click here to read Dr. Slatton’s September 16, 2001 Sermon: “For Such a Time as This”

 

Jesus Follows the Rules

September 1, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Proverbs 25:6-7; Luke 14:1, 7-14

Last week we talked about Jesus breaking the rules and when it might be okay for us to do the same. This week we’ll look at when Jesus followed the rules—his own rules. I suspect Jesus has many rules for us to follow, especially at the table (which is the context for today’s scripture), but the most important one is this: when Jesus hosts the banquest, everyone is invited.

Worship Bulletin – September 1, 2019

 

 

Singing Love in a Culture of Hate

September 1, 2019 (Holland Lectures) | C. Michael Hawn

Holland Lectures 2019
“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are:
Developing a Congregational Identity through Congregational Singing”
with Dr. C. Michael Hawn

As strange as it may seem, singing together has the potential to stem hate. The great commandment: “Love God and love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:30-31; Matthew 22:36-40; Luke 10:27) is rarely quoted in an age of division and hate. Perhaps we need to take what we sing in our sanctuaries to the streets. The Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s is perhaps the most powerful recent example of this. Somehow the songs of this era have given way to strident shrieks and slogans of hate. What might we sing that brings disparate groups – economically, ethnically, politically – together for the good of humanity…

 

 

C. Michael Hawn is one of our nation’s leading experts in hymnology and world music. Now a Richmonder, he recently retired after 25 years from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, as University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and director of the Sacred Music Program. Previously he taught at two Baptist seminaries for a total of 15 years. He leads festivals and publishes extensively in the area of hymnology, is the USA Editor for the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, and writes a weekly hymn studies column entitled History of Hymns. A student of global Christian music, Hawn has conducted research and taught in over 40 countries. In addition, he has sung extensively as a countertenor and is a recovering accordion player.

Congregational singing both forms our individual faith perspective, but also shapes us as the body of Christ in community. These lectures will examine our hymnic heritage that have shaped our faith, look at some trends that are currently influencing the ecumenical church, and consider the cultural, societal, and ethical issues that inspire what we might sing in the future.

“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are.” — Albert van den Heuvel (World Council of Churches, 1966)

Jesus Breaks the Rules

August 25, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Isaiah 5:1-7; Luke 12:49 -56 | Sermon: Dr. Daniel Glaze | Organist: Dr. Bob Gallagher | Guest Choir Director: Rev. Paul Honaker | Guest Accompanist: Mr. Robert Ford | Guest Choir: Jubilation Choir

Jesus didn’t break the rules for fun—he had a purpose. Jesus broke rules for people. When it came to following the rules or blessing people, he chose people every time.

The Jubilation Choir, a senior adult community choir for adults age 55 and older, is in its nineteenth season as an outreach program of the Music Ministry of Salisbury Presbyterian Church. The seventy-two member choir represents approximately thirty-two churches from eight denominations in the Richmond area. Founded in 2001, the choir meets weekly from September through May to sing sacred, secular, and patriotic music. Its mission is to spread fellowship and goodwill through music. Their director is the Rev. Paul S. Honaker, a member of River Road Church, and Mr. Robert R. Ford, a retired United Methodist Church musician, is their pianist.

Worship Bulletin – August 25, 2019

 

 

Ten (or more) Hymns Written in the Twenty-first Century Everyone Should Learn

August 25, 2018 (Holland Lectures) | C. Michael Hawn

Holland Lectures 2019
“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are:
Developing a Congregational Identity through Congregational Singing”
with Dr. C. Michael Hawn

“Each generation must add its stanza to the great hymn of the church,” says my friend United Methodist Bishop Joel Martinez. What is our age saying about our faith and life that has not been said before? As important as it is to sing the songs of the saints, a vital sung faith should also incorporate the “new song” (Psalm 96:1). New songs, if chosen well, can point us in the direction the church should be heading. Yes, we can sing our way to a more faithful church.

 

 

C. Michael Hawn is one of our nation’s leading experts in hymnology and world music. Now a Richmonder, he recently retired after 25 years from Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University, as University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Church Music and director of the Sacred Music Program. Previously he taught at two Baptist seminaries for a total of 15 years. He leads festivals and publishes extensively in the area of hymnology, is the USA Editor for the Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology, and writes a weekly hymn studies column entitled History of Hymns. A student of global Christian music, Hawn has conducted research and taught in over 40 countries. In addition, he has sung extensively as a countertenor and is a recovering accordion player.

Congregational singing both forms our individual faith perspective, but also shapes us as the body of Christ in community. These lectures will examine our hymnic heritage that have shaped our faith, look at some trends that are currently influencing the ecumenical church, and consider the cultural, societal, and ethical issues that inspire what we might sing in the future.

“Tell me what you sing and I’ll tell you who you are.” — Albert van den Heuvel (World Council of Churches, 1966)

Overtaken by Choice

August 18, 2019 (Sunday Morning)

Bible Verses: Isaiah 5:1-7; Luke 12:49 -56 | Sermon: Rev. Anna Perry Miller | Guest Organist: Raymond Chenault | Guest Pianist: Beth Chenault | Soloist: John Tibbetts, baritone

We welcomed to the pulpit Rev. Anna Perry Miller, our Associate Pastor for Adult Discipleship.

We welcomed Raymond Chenault guest organist, Beth Chenault, pianist, and John Tibbetts, soloist this morning. Mr. Chenault and Mr. Tibbetts will be performing in our concert series May 17, 2020.

Worship Bulletin – August 18, 2019